Visit from Dutch Embassy

In January 2016 More For Less was delighted with a visit of the Dutch Embassy (in the person of Mr. Eugene Gies, First Secretary) to our company.

First, we have given a tour at company, where we have spoken about our origin (Tanzanian/European cooperation) and all operations and activities that we carry out today. Amongst other activities, we are mainly working in waste management in Dar es Salaam, where we take care of the collection of household waste and municipal solid waste in especially the districts of Kinondoni and Temeke. We try there to professionalize as much and as soon as possible to work towards a system of increasingly recycling valuable raw materials rather than that these materials are dumped on the Pugu dumpsite. This work we also carry out for several major companies in Dar es Salaam.

We are already working with valuable raw materials to process for recycling goals worldwide. We take out the PET-plastics from the municipal solid waste and prepare this PET for recycling. We collect the PET and bring it to our plant, where we take off the labels and caps. Then the bottles are pressed into bales and made ready for export to big PET-plastic recycling centers worldwide (mainly Asia and Europe).

Then we took Mr. Eugene Gies (First Secretary, Dutch Embassy) for a tour at the Pugu dumpsite, and showed him why it is so important to work towards a more recycling-minded system and not just only dump the municipal solid waste on the Pugu dumpsite.

We have had good discussions and decided that there still needs to be done a lot of work, but we are definitely on the right track.

 

PLEASE FIND SOME PICTURES OF THE TOUR AROUND OUR ACTIVITIES:

 

WASTE COLLECTION (DAR ES SALAAM)
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OUR WORKERS CLEANING THE STREETS OF DAR ES SALAAM

 

PET BOTTLES RECYCLING (WORLDWIDE)

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COLLECTION AND PROCESSING OF PET PLASTIC BOTTLES FOR RECYCLING PLANTS WORLDWIDE

 

 

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